Home   Message   Archive   Theme
hopeless romancer / dopest flow stanzas
Write About Rap

thisaintnopicnic:

Sleater-Kinney — No Cities To Love (Artwork)

Here’s some hi-res artwork from No Cities To Love, the new Sleater-Kinney album coming out January 20.

AHHHHHHHHHHH

via the unrelentingly excellent Ta-Nehisi Coates

via the unrelentingly excellent Ta-Nehisi Coates

laughterkey:

girlpal:

f is for friends who do stuff together

adulthoodisokay this feels relevant

yep. crossedfingersandbones

laughterkey:

girlpal:

f is for friends who do stuff together

adulthoodisokay this feels relevant

yep. crossedfingersandbones

hhanjii:

gridmark:

so a guy gave his friend 10 puns hoping that one of them would make him laugh. sadly, no pun in ten did.

goodbye

■ Voting Technology, Political Responsiveness, and Infant Health: Evidence from Brazil

Abstract: 

This paper studies the introduction of electronic voting technology in Brazilian elections. Estimates exploiting a regression discontinuity design indicate that electronic voting reduced residual (error-ridden and uncounted) votes and promoted a large de facto enfranchisement of mainly less educated citizens. Estimates exploiting the unique pattern of the technology’s phase-in across states over time suggest that, as predicted by political economy models, it shifted government spending towards health care, which is particularly beneficial to the poor. Positive effects on both the utilization of health services (prenatal visits) and newborn health (low-weight births) are also found for less educated mothers, but not for the more educated. 

Emphasis mine. Disenfranchisement of political rights matters, and has large and varied impacts on how policy works. Fights over things like Voter ID and the voting rights of prisoners matter. I know this is obvious, but it’s always good to see the proof.

haaaa
via Chainsawsuit

haaaa

via Chainsawsuit

new album from nicholas krgovich, a guy I saw open one time for Mt Eerie, and that I’ve been following avidly since. what a nice surprise.

One last question. What do you like most about your writing?
You mean like, what quality of it do I like?

Yeah, I just ask every writer I interview: What do you like most about what you do?
And are girls always like, “I hate what I do”?

Girls always shy away from the question and they are like, “Oh” [laughs], and then men are like, “Well, I love the way I structure.” They are so adorable.
“Well, my first novel was really a masterpiece.” You know, sometimes I will be in my house and I will be reading something and I’ll give myself the same feeling, the same feeling that I had when the thing happened all over again, and I go, “I just captured that pretty accurately. That was pretty emotionally effective, Lena. You can have some M&Ms now.”

Roxane Gay interviewing Lena Dunham over at Vulture

■ Why is Infant Mortality Higher in the US than in Europe?

The US has a substantial – and poorly understood – infant mortality disadvantage relative to peer countries. We combine comprehensive micro-data on births and infant deaths in the US from 2000 to 2005 with comparable data from Austria and Finland to investigate this disadvantage. Differential reporting of births near the threshold of viability can explain up to 40% of the US infant mortality disadvantage. Worse conditions at birth account for 75% of the remaining gap relative to Finland, but only 30% relative to Austria. Most striking, the US has similar neonatal mortality but a substantial disadvantage in postneonatal mortality. This postneonatal mortality disadvantage is driven almost exclusively by excess inequality in the US: infants born to white, college-educated, married US mothers have similar mortality to advantaged women in Europe. Our results suggest that high mortality in less advantaged groups in the postneonatal period is an important contributor to the US infant mortality disadvantage.

That’s the abstract, emphasis mine.

Economists making me excited to be one again - Chen, Oster and Williams showing that infant mortality is essentially identical across white women, but strikingly lower across women of colour and other disadvantaged groups.

■ Inflation Hawks’ Views are Independent of Actual Monetary Outcomes

There are some macro-economists who are a) The Worst and b) refuse to update their views given evidence.

There is a special hatred in my heart for intelligent people who don’t revise their views given new evidence.

via The Guardian
in my on-going series of self-explanatory graphs. This time, here’s a nice illustration of the ridiculous objectification of women from a job-search site.

via The Guardian

in my on-going series of self-explanatory graphs. This time, here’s a nice illustration of the ridiculous objectification of women from a job-search site.

■ Walrus mass in vast numbers on Alaska beach as sea ice retreats

wow that is so many fuckin’ walruses. like are you goddamn serious right now holy shit.

■ The Philosopher's Stone: THREE CHEERS FOR JEREMY BENTHAM

I feel like so many posts from this man should be mandatory reading, but then I realise that I am a deep weirdo.

Which brings me back to Bentham and the reason why I started this extended rant.  For all its manifest flaws, utilitarianism is the only ethical theory that actually tells me how to think about one of the hardest questions in political theory and public life:  How can I judge which of the innumerable outrages that assault me deserve my closest attention?  How can I tell whether a complex policy pursued in a complex world is making things better or worse?  Was a homophobic America that treated African-Americans and women as second-class citizens a worse or a better place than an America in which the condition of African-Americans, women, and the LGBT community has dramatically improved, but in which income inequality has soared, the state routinely tortures its political prisoners, and labor unions are dying?  Save by means of some sort of “felicific calculus” [to use the old-fashioned term], I do not know how to begin thinking about this question.

So let’s hear it for old Jeremy Bentham.  A wax replica of his head may sit atop his skeleton stuffed with hay and clad in his own clothes, but his heart was in the right place.

■ You Call This Thai Food? The Robotic Taster Will Be the Judge

This article is blowing my whole goddamn mind. Highlights:

The government-financed Thai Delicious Committee, which oversaw the development of the machine, describes it as “an intelligent robot that measures smell and taste in food ingredients through sensor technology in order to measure taste like a food critic.”

Add to that a soupçon of culinary chauvinism, which holds that authentic Thai food can be prepared only by Thais, usually, Thai cooks say, those who absorbed their cooking acumen tugging on the apron strings of their grandmothers.

“There are many Thai restaurants all around the world that are not owned by Thai people,” said Supachai Lorlowhakarn, an adviser to the National Innovation Agency, which is in charge of the Thai Delicious program. He added, almost apologetically, “They are owned by Vietnam or Myanmar, or maybe even Italian or French.”

The machine evaluates food by measuring its conductivity at different voltages. Readings from 10 sensors are combined to produce the chemical signature.

At a tiny food stall along one of Bangkok’s traffic-clogged boulevards, the owner, Thaweekiat Nimmalairatana, 35, questioned the very notion of standard recipes.

He has been cooking since he was 10 years old and said the slightest variation during the preparation of his dishes — changing the order that ingredients are mixed or the brand of fish sauce — affects the taste.

“I use my tongue to test if it’s delicious or not,” he said. “I think the government should consider using a human to gauge authenticity.”

The incomparable Don Hertzfeld, doing a couch-gag for the Simpsons. wonderful.